Fun knowledge facts about your teeth

You know how to brush and floss properly — and you know you have to visit the dentist at least twice a year for checkups.

But how much do you really know about teeth?

Test your knowledge with our toothy trivia and then drill your friends.

Dental Care Goes Back Thousands of Years

Dentistry is believed to date back more than 5,000 years in Ancient Egypt. Hesy-Ra was a high official during the 3rd Dynasty and had many important roles, including as the personal physician to the pharaoh Djoser and as the original dentist.

How much do you really know about teeth? Test your knowledge with our toothy trivia and then drill your friends.

Little is known about dental care during that time, but it’s believed that he alleviated infection and tooth pain by using crude drills, or by shoving things into decayed or broken teeth to ease pain.

Teeth Are Stronger Than Diamonds

Believe it or not, your tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body — even stronger than your bones. Diamonds are the only substance in the world that’s stronger than tooth enamel.

So, why are our teeth so susceptible to tooth decay? Enamel is brittle and bacteria can cause it to erode and break, leading to cavities and other tooth problems.

Teeth and Tongues Are Truly Unique

You’ve probably heard that no two people have the same fingerprints, but you probably didn’t know that your tongue print is also one of a kind — no one else has the same pattern as you.

No two people have the same set of teeth, either. The size, shape and placement of our teeth might be similar, but not the same — and the marks we leave when we bite into a sandwich, apple or other foods are 100 percent unique, too.

George Washington Didn’t Have Wooden Teeth After All

Dental care in the 1700s was nowhere near as advanced as it is today, so people living in that era experienced their fair share of problems with their teeth.

President George Washington was no exception. The first President of the United States suffered through dental pain, decay and toothaches throughout his life — and he eventually lost all but one of his teeth. But contrary to popular belief, his replacements weren’t made of wood.

According to MountVernon.org, Washington’s first set of dentures was fashioned from ivory and wired to his remaining teeth. Later dentures were said to be “technologically advanced” and made with hippopotamus ivory, gold wire, brass screws and teeth from other humans.

We Produce Swimming Pools Full of Saliva… Literally

The human mouth produces over 25,000 quarts of saliva over a lifetime, on average. That’s enough to fill two swimming pools!

We Spend Over a Month of Our Lives Brushing Our Teeth

Brushing your teeth twice a day for two minutes each doesn’t seem like a lot of time, but it adds up. On average, we spend 38.5 days brushing our teeth throughout our lives. No wonder why we have strong arms!

Adults Have More Than 30 Teeth

Most adults have 32 teeth in their mouths: eight incisors, four canines, eight premolars and 12 molars. However, those without wisdom teeth only have 28.

That might sound like a lot, but many animals have way more teeth than we do. Dogs have 42 teeth, pigs have 44, armadillos have 104 — and snails can have over 25,000! Even more surprising: Blue whales are the largest mammals on earth, but they don’t have any teeth.

Speaking of Animals…

Elephants are polyphyodont, meaning that they go through several sets of teeth during their lifetimes. The chewing teeth are typically replaced (regrown) six times during the lives — and their tusks are actually canine teeth that keep growing.

Teeth Start Forming in the Womb

Baby teeth — also known as milk teeth — might not poke through the gums for several months after birth, but they’re already formed beneath the gumline. These teeth stick around until age six before falling out to make way for permanent teeth. Kids typically have all of their permanent adult teeth by the time they turn 12 or 13.

Contact us at TruFamily Dental to make an appointment today.

Posted In: Oral & Dental Health Tips